Nancy Hornberger

Department of Anthropology
University of Pennsylvania,
U.S.A

Dr. Hornberger is a Professor in the Educational Linguistics Division of the Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania. She is internationally known for her work in bilingualism and biliteracy, ethnography and language policy, and Indigenous language revitalization. She researches, lectures, teaches, and consults regularly on multilingual education policy and practice in the United States and the Andes (Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador) and has also worked in Brazil, China, Mexico, Singapore, South Africa, Sweden and other parts of the world. Dr. Hornberger investigates language and education in culturally and linguistically diverse settings, combining methods and perspectives from educational anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and sociolinguistics.
   Dr. Hornberger is a former editor of the international Anthropology and Education Quarterly and of the ten-volume Encyclopedia of Language and Education.
   Dr. Hornberger investigates language and education in culturally and linguistically diverse settings, combining methods and perspectives from educational anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and sociolinguistics. Currently, Dr. Hornberger is working on Multilingual Language Policy and Classroom Practice: Comparative Perspectives on Indigenous Language Revitalization, a series of case studies based on ethnographic research in Bolivia and short-term ethnographic monitoring consultancies

 

Asmah Haji Omar

Department of Linguistics
University of Malaya,
Malaysia

Professor Emeritus Dr. Asmah Haji Omar is an expert in the Malay language and a well-known figure in the field of language planning. She is also Za’ba Chair Professor of Malay Civilization and Director of the Institute of Malay Civilization at Sultan Idris Education University, Tanjung Malim, Perak. Before that, Asmah was an academic member of Universiti Malaya from 1963 until her retirement as Deputy Vice-Chancellor of Universiti Malaya. In addition, she also held the position of Dean Faculty of Languages ​​and Linguistics and is a member of the Malay Language Standing Committee. Asmah did a lot of research on Peninsular Malaysia. However, her research field is not limited to Peninsular Malaysia. Asmah also conducts a lot of research on the indigenous languages ​​in Sabah and Sarawak. She has published many papers about these languages.

Ben Rampton

Department of Linguistics
King’s College London,
U.K.

Ben was the founding Director of the Centre for Language Discourse & Communication, directed the King’s Interdisciplinary Social Science Doctoral Training Centre from 2011-14, and was founding Convener of the Linguistic Ethnography Forum (2001-09). He has been on the editorial board of more than a dozen international journals (including Journal of Sociolinguistics, Language in Society, Applied Linguistics, Journal of Linguistic Anthropology and Ethnography), and edits Working Papers in Urban Language & Literacies. Ben has an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Copenhagen, and is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and the Royal Anthropological Institute. Ben’s work involves ethnographic and interactional discourse analysis, cross-referring to work in anthropology, sociology, cultural and security studies. His publications focus on language in relation to urban multilingualism, youth, popular culture, ethnicities, class, (in)securitisation, education, second language learning, and research methodology.